Welcome

Sign in or Register?

If you are already a registered user in MEdIES, please sign in and if you wish to become become a user, click on Register.

User sign in

Forgot password?

Not a user? Register Now!

By registering to MEdIES network you will receive ESD updates from the Euro-Mediterranean Mediterranean region.
Your email will be treated as confidential and will not be made known to others.


Click Register and you will be redirected to the registration form.

  el  
Search:  
Go
 
Greek Corner
     
 
 
 
 
Highlights
MEdIES in the GAP Partner Network 1

Neroupoli, the Greek water-city

MARLISCO exhibition

facebook

 
 Calendar
9/24/2019
World's Largest Lesson launching for school year 2019-20
11/3/2019
10th WEEC, Bangkok, 3-7 November 2019
12/9/2019
First World Non-Formal Education Forum
 Read more »
 

 

An interactive youth version of the 2019 GEM Report on migration and displacement is now available, featuring videos and case studies bringing to life some of its key recommendations.
Migration, displacement and education: Building bridges, not walls" the new issues of the GEM Report series
The hard data
- 1 in 5 students are first- or second -generation immigrants in rich countries
- The EU Reception Conditions Directive says EU countries have to grant asylum seekers access to the education systems ‘under similar conditions as nationals’ no more
than three months after their application. In practice, CHILDREN AND YOUTH HAVE WAIT months or years to attend schools
-  Studies in high income countries have reported post‑traumatic stress (due to traumatic experiences of violence and conflict) disorder rates ranging from 10% to 25%. In low and middle income countries, rates as high as 75% have been reported.
- International migration mainly affects high income countries, where immigrants make up at least 15% of the student population in half of schools. It also affects sending countries: More than one in four witness at least one-fifth of their skilled nationals emigrating.  Displacement mainly affects low income countries, which host 10% of the global population but 20% of
the global refugee population, often in their most educationally deprived areas. More than half of those forcibly displaced are under age 18.
By examining representative case studies, collecting good and bad practices, story telling through an interactive way - access to intervies, videos, twitter posts, tect.) the report has prepared the following short but quite strong recommendations:
This report makes seven recommendations that support
implementation of the compacts:
â– â–  Protect the right to education of migrants and
displaced people
â– â–  Include migrants and displaced people in national
education systems
â– â–  Understand and plan for the education needs of
migrants and displaced people
â– â–  Represent migration and displacement histories in
education accurately to challenge prejudices
â– â–  Prepare teachers of migrants and refugees to address
diversity and hardship
â– â–  Harness the potential of migrants and
displaced people
â– â–  Support education needs of migrants and displaced
people in humanitarian and development aid.
Teachers are not counsellors. They need training and support so they can recognise stress and trauma and refer children to specialists.
UNESCO urges teachers to use the Report in classrooms to discuss key issues on migration and displacement around the world, taking each story in turn, discussing the context, the implications and the solutions.
This version will be officially launched later this month at the UN Youth Assembly in New York.
Available at http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/ and http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GEMR_2019-YouthReport-EN_Interactive.pdf


An interactive youth version of the 2019 UNESCO Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report entitled "Migration, displacement and education: Building bridges, not walls" is now available, featuring a lot of case studies and story-telling. Some hard data included:

- Immigrants make up at least 15% of the student population in half of schools, in high income countries

- More than 1 in 4 witness at least 1/5 of their skilled nationals emigrating, in the sending countries.

- In low income countries, which host 10% of the global population but 20% of the global refugee population (often in the most educationally deprived areas),more than half of those forcibly displaced are under age 18.

- 1 in 5 students are first- or second -generation immigrants in rich countries.

- While in the EU Reception Conditions Directive says that countries have to grant asylum seekers access to the education systems "under similar conditions as nationals"  no more than 3 months after their application, in practice, childern and youth have to wait months or years to attend schools.

-  Studies in high-income countries have reported post‑traumatic stress (due to traumatic experiences of violence and conflict) disorder rates ranging from 10% to 25%. In low and middle income countries, rates as high as 75% have been reported.

 

By examining representative case studies, collecting good and bad practices and story telling through an interactive way  (access to intervies, videos, twitter posts, tect.) the report has prepared the following short but straight-forwarded recommendations:

â–  Protect the right to education of migrants and displaced people.

â–  Include migrants and displaced people in national education systems.

â–  Understand and plan for the education needs of migrants and displaced people.

â–  Represent migration and displacement histories in education accurately to challenge prejudices.

â–  Harness the potential of migrants and displaced people

â–  Support education needs of migrants and displaced people in humanitarian and development aid.

â–  Prepare teachers of migrants and refugees to address diversity and hardship. Particularly about trauma: Teachers are not counsellors; They need training and support so they can recognise stress and trauma and refer children to specialists.


UNESCO urges teachers to use the report in their classrooms to discuss key issues on migration and displacement around the world, taking each story in turn, discussing the context, the implications and the solutions.

This version will be officially launched later this month at the UN Youth Assembly in New York.

Access: http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GEMR_2019-YouthReport-EN_Interactive.pdf

Read more about this GEM series http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/

 

 

 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 
     
  Bookmark and Share  
 
 
MEdIES Core Group

MIO-ECSDE

DG Env

GR Gov

UNESCO

UNEP/MAP
 
Especialy for water issues

GWP med

EUWI
Copyright © 1994-2019 MEdIES
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.
Updated by Medies Secretariat
Design and development by Georgios Chatzianastasiou
MEdIES
Mediterranean Education Initiative
For Enviroment & Sustainability

12 Kyrristou str.
105 56 - Athens - Greece

MEdIES Secretariat
Ms Iro ALAMPEI & Ms Vicky MALOTIDI
e-mail: info@medies.net