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 Calendar
5/2/2019
Global Festival of Action for Sustainable Development, Bonn, 2-4 May 2019
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  • Decades of research by organizational scientists, psychologists, sociologists, economists and demographers show that socially diverse groups (that is, those with a diversity of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation) are more innovative than homogeneous groups.
  • It seems obvious that a group of people with diverse individual expertise would be better than a homogeneous group at solving complex, nonroutine problems. It is less obvious that social diversity should work in the same way—yet the science shows that it does.
  • This is not only because people with different backgrounds bring new information. Simply interacting with individuals who are different forces group members to prepare better, to anticipate alternative viewpoints and to expect that reaching consensus will take effort.
  • Read the full article here

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

An interactive youth version of the 2019 GEM Report on migration and displacement is now available, featuring videos and case studies bringing to life some of its key recommendations.
Migration, displacement and education: Building bridges, not walls" the new issues of the GEM Report series
The hard data
- 1 in 5 students are first- or second -generation immigrants in rich countries
- The EU Reception Conditions Directive says EU countries have to grant asylum seekers access to the education systems ‘under similar conditions as nationals’ no more
than three months after their application. In practice, CHILDREN AND YOUTH HAVE WAIT months or years to attend schools
-  Studies in high income countries have reported post‑traumatic stress (due to traumatic experiences of violence and conflict) disorder rates ranging from 10% to 25%. In low and middle income countries, rates as high as 75% have been reported.
- International migration mainly affects high income countries, where immigrants make up at least 15% of the student population in half of schools. It also affects sending countries: More than one in four witness at least one-fifth of their skilled nationals emigrating.  Displacement mainly affects low income countries, which host 10% of the global population but 20% of
the global refugee population, often in their most educationally deprived areas. More than half of those forcibly displaced are under age 18.
By examining representative case studies, collecting good and bad practices, story telling through an interactive way - access to intervies, videos, twitter posts, tect.) the report has prepared the following short but quite strong recommendations:
This report makes seven recommendations that support
implementation of the compacts:
■■ Protect the right to education of migrants and
displaced people
■■ Include migrants and displaced people in national
education systems
■■ Understand and plan for the education needs of
migrants and displaced people
■■ Represent migration and displacement histories in
education accurately to challenge prejudices
■■ Prepare teachers of migrants and refugees to address
diversity and hardship
■■ Harness the potential of migrants and
displaced people
■■ Support education needs of migrants and displaced
people in humanitarian and development aid.
Teachers are not counsellors. They need training and support so they can recognise stress and trauma and refer children to specialists.
UNESCO urges teachers to use the Report in classrooms to discuss key issues on migration and displacement around the world, taking each story in turn, discussing the context, the implications and the solutions.
This version will be officially launched later this month at the UN Youth Assembly in New York.
Available at http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/ and http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GEMR_2019-YouthReport-EN_Interactive.pdf


An interactive youth version of the 2019 UNESCO Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report entitled "Migration, displacement and education: Building bridges, not walls" is now available, featuring a lot of case studies and story-telling. Some hard data included:

- Immigrants make up at least 15% of the student population in half of schools, in high income countries

- More than 1 in 4 witness at least 1/5 of their skilled nationals emigrating, in the sending countries.

- In low income countries, which host 10% of the global population but 20% of the global refugee population (often in the most educationally deprived areas),more than half of those forcibly displaced are under age 18.

- 1 in 5 students are first- or second -generation immigrants in rich countries.

- While in the EU Reception Conditions Directive says that countries have to grant asylum seekers access to the education systems "under similar conditions as nationals"  no more than 3 months after their application, in practice, childern and youth have to wait months or years to attend schools.

-  Studies in high-income countries have reported post‑traumatic stress (due to traumatic experiences of violence and conflict) disorder rates ranging from 10% to 25%. In low and middle income countries, rates as high as 75% have been reported.

 

By examining representative case studies, collecting good and bad practices and story telling through an interactive way  (access to intervies, videos, twitter posts, tect.) the report has prepared the following short but straight-forwarded recommendations:

■ Protect the right to education of migrants and displaced people.

■ Include migrants and displaced people in national education systems.

■ Understand and plan for the education needs of migrants and displaced people.

■ Represent migration and displacement histories in education accurately to challenge prejudices.

Harness the potential of migrants and displaced people

■ Support education needs of migrants and displaced people in humanitarian and development aid.

Prepare teachers of migrants and refugees to address diversity and hardship. Particularly about trauma: Teachers are not counsellors; They need training and support so they can recognise stress and trauma and refer children to specialists.


UNESCO urges teachers to use the report in their classrooms to discuss key issues on migration and displacement around the world, taking each story in turn, discussing the context, the implications and the solutions.

This version will be officially launched later this month at the UN Youth Assembly in New York.

Access: http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GEMR_2019-YouthReport-EN_Interactive.pdf

Read more about this GEM series http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/

 

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

This presentation and fascinating discussion that lasted almost 2hrs, took place on 13/02/2019 in Paris.

It is thought provoking and highly recommended for anyone dealing with the education of children today, icluding parents.

Video in ENGLISH: https://youtu.be/7OBxXE_XabY

Video in FRENCH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B0Lh3W-aZQ

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.
The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.


 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

To bring about quality education, you don't necessarily have to be a policy-maker or a teacher, anyone can help. The Good Life Goals were developed to provide us with some actions applicable to everyone.

 

The GLGs Educate

The Good Life Goals help to teach not just the elite, but everyone on how to reach the goals. For each goal, it offers 5 ways every-day people can make an impact.

Read more

https://www.goodlifegoals.org/

https://sdghub.com/goodlifegoals/

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

Dear all,
Today (24 January), the United Nations celebrates the International Day of Education for the first time. This follows the adoption on 3 December 2018 of resolution 73/25, spearheaded by Nigeria and 58 other Member States, which recognizes the foundational role of education for building resilience, peaceful and inclusive societies. It highlights the global community’s commitment to support transformative actions for inclusive, equitable and quality education for all, and invites UNESCO to facilitate the observance of the Day. It is also an occasion to flag the priorities areas agreed upon at the recent Global Education Meeting, and to emphasize the need for increased political will, collective action and resources to fulfill everyone’s right to quality education.
The first celebration of the Day will be marked  at the United Nations in New York, in an event co-organized by UNESCO and the Permanent Missions of Ireland, Nigeria, Norway, the Republic of Singapore and the State of Qatar.  The event’s theme “Education: A Key Driver for Inclusion and Empowerment” echoes the focus of the UN High Level Political Forum that takes place in New York this July, which will review SDG4, among other goals. Bringing together the voices of governments, the UN system, the private sector and youth organizations, the event will be a platform to highlight education’s vital contribution to the entire 2030 Agenda and to strengthen collective action to achieve SDG4. The event will be live streamed here: http://webtv.un.org/. A video message from the Director-General will be featured at the opening. A Group of Friends for Education and Lifelong Learning will also be launched in New York, formed by representatives of Member States to the UN, to advocate for sustained commitment to education in the 2030 Agenda.
See also the UNESCO International Day of Education webpage.

 

24 January is now marked as the UN International Day of Education! resulted from the adoption on 3 December 2018 of the resolution 73/25 recognizing the foundational role of education for building resilience, peaceful and inclusive societies.

24 January highlights the global community’s commitment to support transformative actions for inclusive, equitable and quality education for all, and invites UNESCO to facilitate the observance of the Day. It is also an occasion to flag the priorities areas agreed upon at the recent Global Education Meeting, and to emphasize the need for increased political will, collective action and resources to fulfill everyone’s right to quality education.

"This day is the occasion to reaffirm fundamental principles. Firstly, education is a human right, a public good and a public responsibility. Secondly, education is the most powerful force in our hands to ensure significant improvements in health, to stimulate economic growth, to unlock the potential and innovation we need to build more resilient and sustainable societies. Lastly, we urgently need to call for collective action for education at global level." Audrey Azoulay, Director General,  UNESCO

Read more about at the UNESCO International Day of Education webpage.

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

UNESCO’s 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report, Migration, displacement and education, shows that the number of migrant and refugee school-age children around the world today has grown by 26% since 2000 and could fill half a million classrooms. The Report highlights countries’ achievements and shortcomings in ensuring the right of migrant and refugee children to benefit from quality education, a right that serves the interests of both learners and the communities they live in.

Read more: http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/

(The report is available in summary and Full text)

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

Education and development
We look back at last year’s developments by featuring insights from key reports and events that will be influencing the international education landscape in the coming year. Among the main issues, the urgent need to address the global learning crisis - according to the UNESCO Institute for Statistic more than 617 million children and young people still lack basic literacy and numeracy skills. The ongoing refugee and migrant crisis calls for additional policy efforts to tackle the challenges it presents for education systems. At the global level, a key issue is that refugee education remains underfunded (GEM Report, 2018). Finally, making available timely and robust data at a national, regional, and international level is fundamental to the progress towards SDG 4, from pre-primary to tertiary and adult education level.

We look back at last year’s developments by featuring insights from key reports and events that will be influencing the international education landscape in the coming year. Among the main issues, the urgent need to address the global learning crisis - according to the UNESCO Institute for Statistic more than 617 million children and young people still lack basic literacy and numeracy skills.

The ongoing refugee and migrant crisis calls for additional policy efforts to tackle the challenges it presents for education systems. At the global level, a key issue is that refugee education remains underfunded (GEM Report, 2018). Finally, making available timely and robust data at a national, regional, and international level is fundamental to the progress towards SDG 4, from pre-primary to tertiary and adult education level.

Read the entire very interesting article

 

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

New, independent observations from ocean buoys and other data sources show Earth's oceans are warming at a rate that's about 40% faster than indicated in the 2013 U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report.

According to the scientists "Just like the oceans buffer the rate of warming, they would also similarly buffer the rate of cooling in a world where we had net-negative emissions"

https://www.axios.com/ocean-heat-climbing-40-percent-faster-carbon-removal-e6a101ee-4488-4f52-ad4c-75b57b8529fe.html?ct=t(01_a8inea_Newsletter12_17_2013_COPY_01)

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

An interactive guide for educators, students, and advocates that explores how food systems and our changing climate interact, and how personal choices can make a difference.

It is available as a free iBook for Mac and iPad users.

Get it on Ibooks
A web version is available for all computers and tablets:

A web version is available for all computers and tablets.

Read more: https://www.ecoliteracy.org/download/understanding-food-and-climate-change-interactive-guide

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 
 

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